Specific Sport Goals for a Team

I had the opportunity to work with a men’s lacrosse. To enhance their performance and decrease injury
risk, I typically attempted to increase their ability to control lower extremity rotation by strengthening
their gluteus Medius (among others). Two simple exercises we would use are lateral bounds and step
ups. Exercises like these that are performed on one extremity to tax the lower extremity stabilizing
muscles in a functional manner.


As a personal trainer, most of my clients are trying to exceed to the next level of competition in their
athletics. The athletes are looking to increase lower extremity strength and overall power. To get this
strength and power, the training program that has to be made has to increase contraction, angel of
training, and velocity of the contractions within those regions (Taniguchi, 1997).
Focusing on strength, bilateral exertion must be executed a little more than the unilateral exertion
(Taniguchi, 1997). My training goal for my clients is to work on the gluteus maximus because most of the
time it is not activated during most sports and exercises (Fischer and Houtz, 1968). The gluteus maximus
is a thigh extensor that has secondary actions for the external rotation and abduction (Fischer et al.,
1968).


To work on this region, we want to work on the hamstrings strength and hip mobility to prevent injuries
within lower extremity and lower back. Some of the exercises that will help my clients achieve this goal
are Nordic hamstring, single leg RDL, stability ball hamstring curl, single leg hip bridge on bosu ball, side-
lying leg lift, and prone hip-extensions. All of these exercises can be increased with weight or a band or
decrease by switching to both legs instead of single leg, to be able to establish proper form and get the
full benefits from the exercises.


Written by:
Sarah Grippi
Owner of 3G

References:

Fischer, F. J., & Houtz, S. J. (1968). Evaluation of the function of the gluteus maximus muscle. An
electromyographic study. American Journal of Physical Medicine, 47(4), 182-191.

Taniguchi, Y. (1997). Lateral specificity in resistance training: The effect of bilateral and unilateral
training. European Journal of Applied Physiology & Occupational Physiology, 75(2), 144.
doi:10.1007/s004210050139